“Dumbfounding Versatility” [1]

By Miriam Ehrlich

Hi, it’s Miriam! The object this week is a beautiful Tiffany glass vase from the Victorian era. It has a wide opening with a fluted rim. It is considered “art glass” because of the unique iridescent glow of purple, blue, and green. It is 2 inches in height and diameter and is in good condition. It is the hidden gem of the current Victorian bedroom in the Deyo house.

tiffany

tiffany

The vase is a perfect example of the Victorian era that spanned from 1837 to 1901. The purpose of art glass both then and now was more for aesthetic purposes than utility, even though it can be used as such.2 Items from the Victorian era were often meant to display wealth and elegance. If this item was in one of the original houses, it surely would have caught the attention of house guests.

Tiffany glass, not to be confused with Tiffany & Co., was started by Louis Comfort Tiffany in the 1800s. A collection of Tiffany’s work is on display in the Morse Museum in Florida. Originally trained as a painter, Tiffany discovered glassmaking in his early 20s, which is the work that makes him most famous today.3 He is credited for the invention of the favrile glass, which is glass that has the iridescent glow.4 This type of glass can be highly valuable, easily costing hundreds, if not thousands of dollars.

Look for this item in the Victorian bedroom in the Deyo House when you take a tour this season!

1 “Louis Comfort Tiffany.” The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art: Winter Park, FL, n.d. Web. May 2016.

2 “Art Glass Vases & Vessels.” Artful Home, n.d. Web. April 2016.

3 “Louis Comfort Tiffany.” The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art: Winter Park, FL, n.d. Web. April 2016.

4 “Louis Comfort Tiffany.” Encyclopædia Britannica, n.d. Web. April 2016.

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